My Last Year, Your Next Year

Henry Ellison_landscape crop

By Henry Ellison (Washington University in Saint Louis)

Editor’s note: Guest blogger Henry Ellison (Washington University in Saint Louis) serves as one of our collegiate leaders on the Fraternity’s board of directors. Each year, four outstanding collegiate leaders like Joey are appointed to serve a one-year term on Sigma Nu’s High Council (board of directors). The 2015 appointment application will be released soon with notification sent via email to all collegiate members. Initial questions about the Collegiate Grand Councilman position may be directed to: headquarters@sigmanu.org. For another account about the Collegiate Grand Councilman experience, check out Joey Thomas’ guest post

You have nothing to lose in applying, and yet gain the opportunity to spend a year in the single most amazing and unique position available to collegians of the Legion of Honor.

About a year ago, I received an email that I assumed to be spam and deleted immediately. Well, almost. Luckily I hesitated and gave it a quick read (this would be a pretty short article had I not). I realized quickly that the email was not spam, but I still had no idea that it would lead to what has easily been the most unique, significant leadership experience of my life.

Sent from the Executive Director (I had no idea what that meant at the time), the email recommended I apply to the High Council (I had even less of an idea what that meant). I received the email late into my first semester as Commander of my chapter because I was registered to attend College of Chapters. Woefully ignorant about the structure of the national fraternity, I took the opportunity to do some quick research into what the email actually meant.

I was amazed and excited by what I found. The High Council, the highest power within the national fraternity when Grand Chapter is not in session, functionally the board of directors, had a place for collegians? I would have an opportunity to influence policy at the national level, as well as get a privileged inside look at how the national fraternity operates? I immediately started my application, took the next few days to draft it, and sent it in.

Tom Bymark and Tim Huffmyer_CofC 2013

Grand Treasurer Tim Huffmyer (Michigan State) working with past Collegiate Grand Councilman Tom Bymark (Minnesota) during a High Council meeting.

I remember so clearly first seeing the members of the Council during the interview at College of Chapters. Sitting across from me, asking me questions were some of the most accomplished and impressive Sigma Nu alumni on the planet. These men all had tremendous success in their careers, as well as their personal lives, and still took time to lead Sigma Nu, a responsibility they took on as volunteers. Simply put I was star struck, and then even more so floored when my name was announced over the speakers at the final dinner.

Since that night, my experience as a Collegiate Grand Councilman has been more than I ever could have imagined. I know that I have grown more in my abilities and style as a leader here than I have as a result of any other position. I have made amazing connections with accomplished industry leaders. I have gained a deep understanding of and appreciation for the structure of the national Fraternity, and am excited by the long-term leadership that we are so lucky to have, between Brad Beacham and the rest of the staff team. I  have also been able to influence national policy using my perspective at a smaller, private university to ensure that our policy nowhere discriminates unfairly against any of our chapters.

Then Regent Charlie Eitel even honored me with a letter of recommendation for medical school. Finally, I have met some truly remarkable people that I will stay in touch with forever, especially the three other collegians that have served with me this year.

I whole-heartedly recommend that any collegian reading this with the opportunity to apply to the High Council for the following year do so. It has been an absolute honor for me, and between the people, the opportunity to get an inside look at the Fraternity, and the ability to shape how the Fraternity functions, it is an experience from which anyone would benefit.

Becoming A Collegiate Grand Councilman

 

Joey Thomas_Epsilon Mu_Clarkson_Fall 2014 (2)

By Joey Thomas (Butler)

Editor’s note: Guest blogger Joey Thomas (Butler) serves as one of our collegiate leaders on the Fraternity’s board of directors. Each year, four outstanding collegiate leaders like Joey are appointed to serve a one-year term on Sigma Nu’s High Council (board of directors). The 2015 appointment application will be released soon with notification sent via email to all collegiate members. Initial questions about the Collegiate Grand Councilman position may be directed to: headquarters@sigmanu.org

“Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” – Winston Churchill

As my plane landed in Tucson, Arizona, the feelings of appreciation, anxiety, and excitement began to overwhelm me, and simultaneously, Thursday, April 24, 2014 became a day I will never forget. It was that day that I had the utmost pleasure of finally meeting, in-person, the seven alumni members of the Sigma Nu High Council as one of four Collegiate Grand Councilmen. Memories of the monthly conference calls and brief run-ins at the 2013 College of Chapters ran through my head, but until this day, I could hardly compare myself with the prestigious men of the High Council. As I looked through the agenda for the weekend-long meeting, I recognized the names of Charlie Eitel, Joe Francis, and Lee Perrett. In my mind, there was a stark contrast between us. They are respected, dedicated, and successful. They have proven their worth to not only this great Fraternity but also in their professional and personal lives. To them, I could easily be seen as a lowly college kid from Butler University, who happened to stumble into a successful Sigma Nu chapter and be elected Commander. But they did not. In fact, they often seemed more impressed with the four of us collegians than we were of them.

As we gathered for dinner, I began to feel more at ease. It was at this point of relaxation that Regent Eitel asked each collegian to stand and “say a few words.” Immediately, the nerves returned. What would I say? Vice Regent John Hearn advised me to say something sooner rather than later, and as I stood to speak; I recognized that everyone at the table stopped eating and began to listen. This became the theme throughout the year. The alumni members of the High Council have continued to listen to my opinion, and in doing so, these brothers have taught me many valuable lessons.

High Council_66th GC

The High Council of Sigma Nu at the 66th Grand Chapter in Nashville, Tenn. The Council is made up of seven alumni members and four collegiate members.

After being elected Commander of the Epsilon Mu Chapter, I was immediately dubbed a leader. Throughout the year, I learned many lessons – most of them through my own failures. By the end of my term, I felt that I had finally earned this title. However, Executive Director Brad Beacham, and past Regent Charlie Eitel have taught me many more important lessons about effective leadership. As a Collegiate Grand Councilman, I have been able to witness a high level of respect and admiration for individuals and their opinions. Due to their dedication and ethical leadership, Sigma Nu has evolved into a well-oiled machine.

These alumni leaders have exemplified the values of our organization, and they demonstrate what it truly means to live by our values of Love, Honor, and Truth each and every day. Love is shown in the authentic friendships between all members of the High Council. Truth is uniquely manifested at each meeting as we discuss past experiences and openly communicate our opinions about the future of our organization. Lastly, Honor guides our every action.

I have had the privilege to stand among these inspirational alumni leaders to offer genuine insight into the current collegiate experience. By way of our principles, my voice is heard with clarity and significance. Our success does not come by simple fortune, but rather by a dedication to respect, moral rectitude, and the ability to listen to our fellow brothers. It has been an absolute honor to be a part of the High Council, to learn from the exceptional example set forth by these men, and most importantly to forward the ideals of our Fraternity for all members.

Results of the 2014 LEAD Assessment Part 2

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By Scott Smith (Central Arkansas)

Editor’s Note: Sigma Nu’s LEAD Program, unveiled in 1988, has been the Fraternity’s premier ethical leadership development program for collegiate members for over two and a half decades. Since 2006, the Fraternity has evaluated the LEAD Program through George Mason University’s Center for the Advancement of Public Health. The following series of posts will show the results of the most recent study and update members on the program’s continued progress. Read Part 1 here.

A review of open-ended feedback from the 2014 evaluation reveals that participants see value in the bonding and educational experiences and opportunities provided by the LEAD Program. However, several myths and misconceptions about the intended purpose, implementation models, flexibility, and elective nature of the program persist. Continued enhancements and improvements will continue to be made to the online and facilitated materials as well as our overall training efforts to address these concerns.

No doubt, there are continued opportunities to improve the program and increase its relevance and value for collegiate members. Staff are hard at work reviewing the full transcripts of student responses and ideas – over 350 pages worth – and will be working to include updated activities, examples, and topics.

Excerpted Responses

Student response to the new open-ended questions about how the LEAD Program has made a difference in their life, affected their leadership capabilities, future planning capabilities, and personal decision making were overwhelmingly positive. A small sampling of those responses is provided below.

  • LEAD helped me learn a lot about myself. Through LEAD, I have been able to set goals beyond graduation and has provided me with the knowledge of how to accomplish the goals I have set for myself. In addition, I believe LEAD has built stronger relationships within my chapter. I went through LEAD as a candidate and the memories I made with my fellow candidates while going through LEAD will be some of my favorites when I look back on my college experience.
  • As a student, it gave me the opportunity to talk about the stuff that I needed to talk about. As a man, it educated me on several different things that led to positive change in different aspects of my life (e.g. relationships, business, personality differences, organization).
  • LEAD provided me with an idea of how much more important Sigma Nu as a whole really is. LEAD offers great advice for not only leadership skills, but also skills needed to become the best man possible!
  • Actually running the program has given me great event planning experience. The actual sessions have made me a better and more morally driven man.
  • Because of the LEAD program I have developed better interpersonal skills, I have also learned to evaluate my ethics and values during my decision-making. I have set more concrete, attainable academic goals.
  • I am currently the LEAD Chairman of our chapter. Before I was elected, I really wanted to see a change with how our chapter implemented LEAD itself; I wanted to see full Phase sessions, All Chapter sessions, and a strong foundation of ethics built into our brotherhood. We are in the process of achieving this goal right now, but already, the results are evident: brothers are more interested in participating, people are more considerate of others’ values, and more importantly, the tenets of Love, Honor, and Truth are making a loud, and righteous, comeback within our chapter.

Background Information

The Fraternity began its partnership with George Mason University’s Center for the Advancement of Public Health (GMU’s CAPH) in 2005 for the purpose of conducting an independent, scientific analysis of the LEAD Program. Six national evaluations have been conducted since that time, each further proving the impact of the program and providing insights for the program’s continued development. The intent of this partnership is to evaluate the efficacy of the LEAD Program. The evaluation has several goals: to gain insights about the impact of the Sigma Nu experience and, more specifically, that of the LEAD Program; to learn how LEAD Program participants differ from LEAD non-participants; and to learn strategies that will improve the implementation of the LEAD Program.

What’s Your LEAD Story?

Brothers are more interested in participating, people are more considerate of others’ values, and more importantly, the tenets of Love, Honor, and Truth are making a loud, and righteous, comeback within our chapter.

The data is in and the results are clear – LEAD is a proven effective program when it comes to helping the Fraternity achieve its crucial mission. The statistics and responses highlighted above tell a national story about the impact of providing our members with the necessary skills and venues to have honest conversations about what it takes to be an ethical leader – in the chapter, on campus, in the classroom, in the community, and beyond the college years. What’s your LEAD story?

Have an idea for the LEAD Program, question about this research initiative, or want to share your LEAD story – send us an email, news@sigmanu.org, or let us know in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

Results of the 2014 LEAD Assessment Part 1

Francis

By Scott Smith (Central Arkansas)

Editor’s Note: Sigma Nu’s LEAD Program, unveiled in 1988, has been the Fraternity’s premier ethical leadership development program for collegiate members for over two and a half decades. Since 2006, the Fraternity has evaluated the LEAD Program through George Mason University’s Center for the Advancement of Public Health. The following series of posts will show the results of the most recent study and update members on the program’s continued progress. Read part 2 here

To develop ethical leaders inspired by the principles of Love, Honor and Truth.

To foster the personal growth of each man’s mind, heart and character.

To perpetuate lifelong friendships and commitment to the Fraternity.

This is the mission of our Fraternity – our reason for being – and the end we all seek for Sigma Nu. One of the greatest tools the Fraternity has for achieving this great mission and developing the future leaders of business, government, academia, and society is the LEAD Program. The first of its kind – often imitated but never duplicated – the award-winning LEAD Program is the only ethical leadership development program of its kind in the Greek world. Looking back on the past two and a half decades, there is a lot to be proud of when it comes to the LEAD Program. An overhauled curriculum for its 10th birthday, a redesigned presentation and online presence to celebrate turning 20, a host of national awards and recognition, and six national scientific evaluations that prove its effectiveness.

This spring the Fraternity, in partnership with researchers at George Mason University’s Center for the Advancement of Public Health, conducted an independent, scientific analysis of the LEAD Program. Collegiate members from 99% of our chapters and representing 23% of the Fraternity’s collegiate membership shared information about their Sigma Nu experience and, in particular, how the LEAD Program has impacted them.

Significant Findings

This year’s evaluation shows again that the LEAD Program is providing measurable, added value to the collegiate membership experience.

More LEAD makes for a better individual and chapter, and in turn a Fraternity that is developing ethical leaders for society.

LEAD works. Participants in the program show statistically significant differences from non-participants across key variables related to fraternal relationships, future planning, and personal decision-making. LEAD participants are significantly more likely to:

  • Have more direction than before joining Sigma Nu.
  • Agree that their fraternity experience has imparted skills and knowledge that will help them be successful in leadership roles throughout their life.
  • Identify that as a result of their Sigma Nu membership they are better prepared to be successful in the real world.
  • Identify that as a result of their Sigma Nu membership they are better prepared to be successful academically.
  • Identify that as a result of their Sigma Nu membership they are better prepared to be successful interpersonally.
  • Believe they are better equipped to work through ethical dilemmas as a result of their Sigma Nu membership.
  • Believe they are morally or ethically responsible for others’ accountability.
  • Agree that they hold others accountable for their actions.
  • Identify that their Sigma Nu experience has helped to develop their problem solving skills.

These statistically significant differences continue to indicate that LEAD is better in measurable ways than any holistic homegrown programming offered at the local level and certainly better than no membership development opportunities at all. LEAD is a great program that provides a significant return on investment for participants.

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Further, more LEAD makes for a better membership experience. Comparisons of students using four or more phases to all other LEAD participants AND comparisons of those using Phases I and II to those members who have only experienced Phase I (candidate education) show significant differences. Students using four or more phases of LEAD compared to all other LEAD participants are significantly more likely to:

  • Feel comfortable expressing their opinion with chapter members, even if they believe others will disagree.
  • Agree that their involvement in Sigma Nu has helped them to hone their leadership skills and abilities.
  • Believe they are responsible for providing an example for others.
  • Expect to participate as an alumnus facilitator for LEAD after they graduate.
  • Believe that for long-lasting change to be effective that those affected by the change must be bought into the change.
  • Agree that their fraternity experience has provided them with skills and knowledge that will help them be successful in leadership roles throughout their life.
  • Identify that as a result of their Sigma Nu membership they are better prepared to be successful in the real world.
  • Know how and when to confront brothers who are violating the national fraternity’s standards and values.
  • Agree that their experience in Sigma Nu has helped them to develop their problem solving skills.
  • Agree that it is important to build consensus around ideas.

These students also believe that LEAD:

  • Has helped them to grow as an individual.
  • Is worth the time and effort they put into the program.
  • Has helped them develop stronger friendships with their fraternity brothers.
  • Has provided unique opportunities for personal development that were unavailable from other venues within their college.
  • Facilitator materials and online content are useful and that the program runs smoothly in their chapter.
  • Identify that since implementing LEAD they have seen increased participation in their chapter from brothers.
  • See themselves donating time, talent, and treasure to support the LEAD Program once they graduate.
  • Identify that the presence of a program like LEAD drew them to join Sigma Nu.

Students with Phase I and II experience compared to those that have only done Phase I (candidate education) are significantly more likely to:

  • Agree that their involvement in Sigma Nu has helped them to hone their leadership skills and abilities.
  • Expect to participate as an alumnus facilitator for LEAD after they graduate.
  • Be more involved with other activities on campus aside from Sigma Nu.
  • Believe that LEAD has helped them to grow and develop as an individual and is worth the time and effort they put into the program.
  • See themselves donating time, talent, and treasure to support the LEAD Program once they graduate.

In basic terms, these comparisons indicate that more access and exposure to increasing phases of the LEAD Program provides a cumulative benefit; that is, more LEAD makes for a better individual and chapter, and in turn a Fraternity that is developing ethical leaders for society.

Have an idea for the LEAD Program, question about this research initiative, or want to share your LEAD story – send us an email, news@sigmanu.org, or let us know in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

What if your chapter had to recruit without spending a dime?

Letters for Bid Day_Mu Kappa_Fall 2013

By Josh Green (Arizona)

Editor’s note: this article was originally run in 2011 and was composed by then director of recruitment Josh Green. 

Tough times have forced businesses to slash their headcount, marketing budgets, and other resources. Managers at small start-ups and Fortune 100 companies alike are now expected to do more with less-but how?

I recently attended a meeting of young non-profit professionals that discussed the book Zilch by Nancy Lublin. The book covers a number of important topics with a focus on non-profits that are expected to perform at a high level with limited resources (sound familiar?). After leaving the meeting I had an idea based on the title of the book: what if we had to recruit without using money?

The first thing that came to mind was getting back to basics. Swearing off money would require us to practice the fundamentals: going out and meeting people, making friends, bringing them out to meet the chapter members, gauging their interest and then extending a bid after the chapter votes.

Relying too much on a large recruitment budget may be the subtle sign of a recruitment strategy lacking substance and genuineness.

How can this be done? I started a list of recruitment tactics that don’t really cost anything. Here’s what I came up with:

  1. Talk to your high school friends, or even a past principal or guidance counselor, and see who is planning to attend your college or university.
  2. Talk to your fraternity and sorority life professional to see if you can acquire the contact information for all incoming male freshmen. Depending on the number, call or email them and let them know what Sigma Nu has going on – maybe campus orientation events, move-in assistance, new student workshops like student skills or time management.
  3. Post information on various Facebook groups. An example could be to post on the page for the upcoming freshman class.
  4. Once school starts, introduce yourself to as many people as possible. After all, we are a social fraternity, so you shouldn’t have any issues being social and meeting new people.
  5. Join a club or student organization to meet some additional friends with similar interests.

These are just five ideas I came up with on the drive home. I am sure that are many others that could be developed. And these are just a few ideas on how to meet people. This doesn’t even get into brining them out, which can still be done at no additional cost.

Recruiting without spending a dime relies on creativity and will. This is thinking like an entrepreneur – innovate and be social.

Relying too much on a large recruitment budget may be the subtle sign of a recruitment strategy lacking substance and genuineness. What are some additional ways your chapter can bring a culture of innovation to recruitment?

Bid Day_Ryan Love_Epsilon Mu

Why Your Chapter Needs an Alumni Advisory Board

Tom Bymark and Tim Huffmyer_CofC 2013

Advisory boards allow many young members the chance to interact with an older alumnus who can help them navigate the difficult waters of being a chapter leader.

By Ben Nye (Arkansas) and Todd Denson (Nicholls State)

If you’re chapter is like many across the country, it could stand to have more alumni advising. The problem is complicated: many chapters are advised by one or two overextended alumni while other alumni don’t know how to be involved or hesitate to commit to advising because of other activities. Fortunately, the alumni advisory board (AAB) model addresses these problems while providing an avenue for multiple alumni to be involved in the advisement of the chapter.

Spreading the Workload

According to The Atlantic, the average adult between 25 and 54 with children only has 2.6 hours per day for free time and leisure. That time has to be distributed among competing priorities such as family, work responsibilities, and community involvement.

Busyness undoubtedly prevents many alumni from committing to advising and overextends the ones who are involved. Fortunately, a well-constructed advisory board gives each board member smaller commitments and a focused area of advisement. As each member of the board picks a different officer to advise, the advising is spread across the entire board. Each advisor can then focus on their particular area and develop a more specific advising strategy.

The Theta Kappa AAB, at Georgia Southern University, has used this to their advantage. In an interview with Theta Kappa AAB Chairman Bill Geddy, he pointed to the work of John Austin in the area of risk reduction advising. John Austin, the risk reduction advisor on Theta Kappa’s AAB, has developed a unique curriculum that he is able to train the new Risk Reduction Chairman on each year. Brother Austin’s contributions have been the result of a focus on purely risk reduction related topics and would likely have not happened had Austin not been allowed to specialize in one area of advisement.

Opportunities for Mentorship

Courtesy of Flickr use USFWSmidwest.

Courtesy of Flickr use USFWSmidwest.

Writing about mentorship for The Art of Manliness, Bret McKay reflected that, “In addition to providing some guidance in navigating through life as a man, mentors can expand one’s view of what it means to be a man.” Mentorship is exactly what alumni advisory boards give to officers in Sigma Nu, and for many, this is a deep need. Many officers are getting their first taste of leadership and are at a particularly crucial point in their development.

Advisory boards allow many young members the chance to interact with an older alumnus who can help them navigate the difficult waters of being a chapter leader. This is the type of mentorship that can pay dividends years down the road.

Training Alumni Leaders

Another positive aspect of AABs is that they help in identifying new alumni leaders. Because advisory boards have a much greater number of advising positions available, it is possible to get younger or previously disengaged alumni involved.

It is also possible to groom younger members of the advisory board for more senior positions on the board. Theta Kappa’s advisory board members begin serving as members-at-large and then transition into specific advising positions. Having this transition period allows for the new members to determine a time to pick a role and then learn under the previous advisor.

Having a system like this in place allows the alumni advisor the chance to learn the ropes and many alumni advisory boards will transition leaders after a pre-determined period. This allows for other board members to get engaged in specific advising roles or in leadership of the board.

In addition to providing some guidance in navigating through life as a man, mentors can expand one’s view of what it means to be a man.

Improves Accountability

Lastly, alumni advisory boards can help hold chapter leaders accountable. As an example, the Georgia Tech alumni advisory board meets monthly with the officers of the chapter. During this monthly meeting, the alumni review the goals and progress of each chapter officer. The advisors also ask questions and provide suggestions to the officers.

This additional perspective ensures that each officer is focused on his duties and tasks that need to be completed. Whether it is monthly, quarterly, or semesterly, the advisory board reviews the progress of the chapter leadership and can help steer the chapter in the right direction.

Getting Started

Chapters benefit when they have AABs: collegians benefit from mentorship and accountability and alumni benefit from a decentralized workload and specialized advisement. What remains is building an alumni advisory board for your chapter. This will be the subject of our next post in the area of alumni development.

In the meantime, the Best Practices Library (BPL) is designed to give specific examples of how Sigma Nu chapters have achieved excellence in alumni relations and helps provide a road map for other chapters to do likewise. The BPL includes specific practices submitted by many of the most successful chapter advisors, alumni advisory board members, and housing corporation board members in Sigma Nu.

For more information about alumni programming and resources, contact Todd Denson, director of alumni and volunteer programs (todd.denson@sigmanu.org).

Keeping Homecoming and Tailgating Safe

OSU Tailgate_Epsilon Epsilon_Fall 2014

Tailgating at Epsilon Epsilon (Oklahoma State).

By Drew Logsdon (Western Kentucky)

It’s that amazing time of year again when college campuses across the nation are weekly engulfed with the excitement of their alma maters taking the field for one of America’s greatest past-times: college football.

For Sigma Nu chapters across the nation, this time of year also means a flurry of tailgating and homecoming festivities. While this season is important to chapters and counts as a time-honored tradition, it’s equally important for every chapter to understand the risks involved with hosting or participating in this unique type of social function.  As legendary Alabama football coach Paul “Bear” Bryant once said, “It’s not the will to win that matters – everyone has that. It’s the will to prepare to win that matters.”

So let’s look at tailgating and homecoming to fully understand the risks and how to avoid them altogether.

Ole Miss Grove_Flickr_Ken Lund

The Grove at the University of Mississippi. Courtesy of Flickr user Ken Lund.

Tailgates

Tailgating for football games can be one of the greatest examples of fellowship that college provides. Seas of grass become blanketed in an explosion of school colors, tents, grills, and fans.

However, the most obvious risk associated with these activities is alcohol. And alcohol can sour the good nature and fun of sportsmanship faster than Auburn can return a missed field goal for a touchdown. The fact that games tend be played at odd times doesn’t help either. Many Saturday games kickoff at noon or earlier which means most of those who have been consuming alcohol at a tailgate haven’t had much to eat.

Another big risk with tailgating comes after the game. Members and guests may return to the chapter house intoxicated which means some could have been on-again-off-again drinking alcohol for a 12+ hour period of time.

One of the best things your chapter can do is simply provide food. Have each member sign up for a food item to bring or have food catered. Be sure to consult your school’s policies on food to ensure that your chapter doesn’t conflict with your university’s food contract or grilling policies.

For more ideas on how to manage the risk of tailgating check out the resource We Have a Situation.

Penn State Homecoming Float

The Delta Delta (Penn State) Chapter home during the school’s homecoming last fall.

Homecoming

Homecoming is my favorite time of football season, as it is for many alumni. It’s a great time to see chapter brothers I haven’t seen regularly since graduation. I doubt I’m the only alumnus with these feelings and so it’s not surprising that this is an event I mark on the calendar well in advance.

But for your chapter, homecoming can present its own unique set of challenges. Not all alumni return to campus with the best of intentions and some may return with different ideas of what homecoming is all about.

It’s always best to ensure that your chapter communicates their homecoming plans with alumni well in advance. If the chapter isn’t doing anything at the house then take steps to make sure it is properly secured with help from the house corporation.

Here’s an article from a past Risk Reduction Newsletter about the importance of putting your best foot forward at homecoming and how the chapter’s behavior could negatively affect alumni relations in a single event: http://www.sigmanu.org/documents/risk_reduction_newsletter_2012_10.pdf

 

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